Determining a KM strategy in a Government agency.

I've been involved in a number of interesting projects recently, so I'm going to make more of an effort to blog a little about these. One recent engagement was with a Federal Government agency, to help them determine a KM strategy. They had been discussing KM internally for some time, and while these conversations were very interesting there was no progress being made towards working out a concrete approach. To attempt to kick-start things, I was brought in to run a half-day facilitated session with the KM working group. The goal: determine the start of a concrete and practical KM

Book review: Leading Change.

Leading ChangeJohn P. Kotter It is widely recognised that organisations are under greater pressure than ever before to adapt to meet new conditions and challenges within their marketplaces. This has spawned many change management projects, reorganisations and strategic realignments. Most of these have failed. This book takes a much-needed look at how the process of organisational change must operate if it is to have both short-term impact and long-term sustainability. At the core of the book, is a eight-step process: Establishing a sense of urgency Creating the guiding coalition Developing a vision and strategy Communicating the change vision Empowering broad-based

KM becoming RM?.

I thought I would post a quick comment on a trend that I've been seeing in Australian public-sector organisations: knowledge management becoming records management. That is, the "knowledge management initiative" is handed across to the library/records management folk, who then implement projects such as: records management systems document management systems corporate taxonomies/thesaurii While these are all important things to do, they are obviously only a very small corner of knowledge management. Yet, in many organisations I've seen, this is all that's left of the initial enthusiasm about KM. In these situations, there is no focus on the people-related aspects (such

Intranets and knowledge sharing.

The intranet can serve as a platform for knowledge management initiatives, via approaches such as collaborative environments, staff directories, wikis and weblogs.

Different approaches to KM, same results?.

This week I was at the Act-KM conference on knowledge management, held in Canberra. Sitting listening to the presentations, and talking with my peers, something really struck me: A number of people are conducting what I would call "needs analysis" activities, including myself. A wide range of techniques and approaches are currently being used, including: James Robertson (Step Two Designs): reviews focused on the intranet, based on stakeholder interviews, expert reviews and workplace observation. Ends up identifying issues much more broadly than the intranet, including organisational-wide cultural and process problems. Robert Perey (Knowledge Index): conducts knowledge reviews builds around complexity

Selecting staff for interviews.

This briefing focuses on who to select for stakeholder interviews. It provides some general guidelines, and lists some areas of the organisation to involve.